Soups

Onion Soup – thermalcookware.com

A very tasty soup with red wine and herbs

Serves 10

* 1 teaspoon of Olive Oil.
* 3 tablespoons of Tomato Paste.
* 2 kgms of Onions, peeled and sliced into large chunks.
* 10 cloves of Garlic, peeled and crushed.
* 6 Shallots, peeled and chopped.
* 1 kgm of Leeks, slice the white part approximately 6mm thick.
* 1/4 of a tablespoon of Cayenne Pepper.
* 2 1/2 tablespoons of fresh whole Thyme leaves.
* 1 1/2 cups of Red Wine.
* 1 litre of Vegetable Stock.
* 1 teaspoon of Salt.
* 2 Bay Leaves.
* 3/4 of a cup of grated Parmesan Cheese.

Cooking time on the stove: – 15 minutes.

Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of 2 hours.

1. Over a medium heat, brush a large skillet with the Olive Oil.
2. Add the Tomato Paste and cook until the colour darkens, stirring to prevent scorching for about 5 minutes.
3. Stir in the Onions, Garlic, Shallots, Leeks, Cayenne Pepper and Thyme and then cook until the Onions become
translucent and start to caramelize, about 8 minutes.
4. Stir in the Red Wine and bring to the boil.
5. Transfer the Onion mixture to the Cook and Carry pot.
6. Add the Vegetable Stock, Salt and Bay Leaves.
7. Raise the heat and bring it to the boil.
8. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker.
9. Allow to cook for a minimum of 2 hours.

To serve: –

Ladle the soup into individual bowls and garnish each with about a table spoon of grated Parmesan Cheese.

Pumpkin Soup –thermalcookware.com

A deliciously creamy pumpkin soup with a touch of bacon tang. Ideal for cold winters afternoons and evenings.

Serves 6

* 40 grams of Butter.
* 2 tablespoons of Olive Oil.
* 2 diced Onions.
* 3 cloves of Garlic.
* 3 rashers of Bacon trimmed and diced.
* 1 Massel Vegetable Stock cube.
* 1 kg Pumpkin (preferably Jap) peeled and cut into fairly large chunks.
* 6 stalks of Parsley.
* 1/2 a cup of Milk or Coconut Milk Powder.
* Salt and Pepper to taste.
* Sour Cream and chopped Chives for a garnish when serving.

Cooking time on the stove: – 5 minutes.

Thermal cooking: – 1 hour minimum.

1. Gently fry the onions, garlic and bacon in the butter and olive oil in the pot over a medium heat.
2. Turn the heat down and add the pumpkin and enough boiling water to fill the pot to approximately 80% then add the stock
cube, parsley, salt and pepper.
3. Bring the pot back to the boil and then simmer on a low heat for 5 minutes with the lid on.
4. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot to the outer Thermal Cooker and close the lid.
5. After atleast 1 hour remove the inner pot and puree the soup with milk or coconut milk powder.
6. Serve and garnish with the sour cream and chopped chives.

Garden Vegetable Soup –thermalcookware.com

A delightful chunky vegetable soup ideal for cold winters afternoons.

Serves 6.

* 6 cups of water.
* 1 table spoon of Olive Oil.
* 2 large Onions, peeled and chopped into chunks.
* 1 stalk of Celery chopped into large pieces.
* 2 medium Carrots, peeled and diced.
* 2 cloves of Garlic, peeled and finely chopped.
* 2 medium Potatoes, peeled and diced.
* 1 cup of fresh or frozen green Beans.
* 1 can of Kidney Beans, well rinsed.
* 4 Roma Tomatoes diced.
* 1 tablespoon of Basil chopped finely.
* Pepper and Salt to taste.
* 125 gm of uncooked Pasta Noodles.

Cooking time on the stove: – 10 minutes.

Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of 2 hours.

1. Bring the water to the boil in the pot on medium heat.
2. Heat the Olive Oil in a frying pan on medium heat.
3. Stir fry the Onions and Celery for a minute then add the other vegetables one at a time.
4. Sprinkle with Basil, Pepper and Salt and stir fry well for about 3 minutes.
5. Stir the cooked vegetables into the pot and bring the water back to the boil.
6. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker for a minimum of 2 hours.
7. When the meal is ready to eat cook the Pasta separately and stir it into the soup on serving.

Chicken Soup – thermalcookware.com

An indispensable base for many dishes, but this broth is perhaps best appreciated just as it is, for both taste and healing qualities.

Chicken Broth
Ingredients:
1 free range chicken (about 1.6 kg)
1 large onion halved
2 small carrots
2 sticks of celery, halved widthways
1 head of garlic , halved widthways
1 teaspoon of black peppercorns
1 tablespoon of sea salt
2 fresh bay leaves

Simmering time on the stove top: 20 minutes

Thermal cooking time: 3 hours minimum

Method:
1. Place the ingredients into the saucepan and pour over enough water to cover the chicken.
2. Slowly bring this to the boil.
3. Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
4. Transfer the inner saucepan into the vacuum insulated outer container and cloase the lid.
5. Leave for a minimum of 3 hours.
6. Remove the chicken from the inner saucepan and strain the broth and discard the remaining solids.
7. Remove the meat from the chicken, discard the skin and bones.
8. Coarsely shred the chicken meat.

For Chicken Soup
Ingredients:
Broth from above
Coarsely shredded chicken meat from above
25 grams of butter
2 large onions cut into 1 cm pieces
3 cloves of garlic, crushed
3 small leeks, white part only, cut into 1cm pieces
3 stalks of celery, cut into 1cm pieces
1/2 a cup of coarsely chopped flat leaf parsely
Wholemeal multigrained bread or rolls, warmed to serve.

Simmering time on the stove top: 10 minutes

Thermal cooking time: 30 minutes minimum

Method:
1. Heat the butter in the inner saucepan over a low heat and add the onions, garlic, leek and celery.
2. Cook until the onion is soft.
3. Add the chicken meat and broth, slowly bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
4. Transfer the inner saucepan into the vacuum insulated outer container and close the lid.
5. Leave for a minimum of 30 minutes.
6. Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, then stir in the parsely and serve with warmed wholemeal bread or rolls.

http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Heat-retention_cooking

Heat-retention cooking

From Solar Cooking

Heat-retention cooking (or retained-heat cooking) saves cooking fuel because after food has been heated to cooking temperature, it is placed into an insulated box where it will continue to cook until it is done. Retained-heat cooking is often introduced along with solar cooking since it further reduces the use of traditional fuels such as firewood, and the use of this method allows much more food to be cooked each day in a solar cooker. This method of cooking is also known as fireless cooking, haybox cooking, or wonder box cooking.

Using an solar box cooker as a retained-heat cooker

Rice being cooked in a heat-retention cooker

Rice being cooked in a heat-retention cooker

When combining retained heat and solar cooking, if food has gotten thoroughly hot in an solar box cooker (SBC), but clouds arrive before the food is finished cooking, a switch from solar to retained heat cooking should be made before the oven temperature drops below the boiling point. For large recipes this may be accomplished by simply closing the reflective lid on the pots of cooking foods. For smaller recipes, the solar oven is opened, taking care not to allow steam to escape from under the lids, pots are pushed close together along with any heated additional mass. Insulating pads or soft cushions are tucked closely around the pots and well heated mass. The SBC lid is then closed. This effectively makes the transition from solar to retained heat cooking. The cooker lid remains closed until shortly before serving time, when the food is tested. If not completely done, a very little conventional fuel will usually finish the job.Usually solar/retained heat cooking is done right where the SBC is located. However, a lightweight portable SBC can be moved temporarily indoors for its retained heat cooking time if the sun clouds over or if it rains. It may also be brought inside more or less permanently during the off season or at night and function as an insulated box for retained heat cooking. Used in this way the SBC continues to save fuel rather than simply being stored until conditions are right for solar cooking.

Heat-retention_cooking_times.gif

See Also

Related links

Demonstrations of a thermal cooker working

The good folks down under at http://www.thermalcookware.com.au have added some great online cooking demonstrations to view on cooking Lamb Shanks, Thai Green Curried Chicken and Rice and even making Carrot Cake in the THERMOS brand thermal cooker. These demonstrations use the RPC-4500 and RPC-6000 models.

Give them a look see at:

http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/main.php?mod=Dynamic&id=43

The individual links are as follows:

Lamb Shank:

http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/images/uploaded/media/thermal001_1.wmv

Thai Green Curried Chicken and Rice

http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/images/uploaded/media/thermal001_2.wmv

Carrot Cake

http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/images/uploaded/media/thermal001_3.wmv

Note: to view the demos in the four above links, you may need Internet Explorer and Windows Media player.

Another commercial brand thermal cooker is the Dream-Pot sold in Australia.

Dream-Pot Thermal Cooking (Part 1) – Silverside Corned Beef

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUKBjMXwtyI

Dream-Pot Thermal Cooking (Part 2)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5idSW284ffo

Dream-Pot

http://www.queenslandweekender.com.au/gsec2cqw/story.asp?weekID=111&storyID=604

The following demonstrations are for the Thermal Magic Cooker or Thermo Magic Pot thermal cooker

Thermal Cooking Meat Loaf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x33XMFpdahY

Thermal Cooking Vegi Bake

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yp-XZocac20

Thermal Cooking Butter Cake

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjM8FRnXZjI

Thermal Cooking Silver Side

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh8-g_oAHBo

The ECOPOT

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZ4nRTHEDS8

COOKING WITH RETAINED HEAT

COOKING WITH RETAINED HEAT

http://www.inforse.dk/europe/dieret/Biomass/biomass.html

In regions where much of the daily cooking involves a long simmering period (required for many beans, grains, stews and soups) the amount of fuel needed to complete the cooking process can be greatly reduced by cooking with retained heat. This is a practice of ancient origin which is still used in some parts of the world today.
In some areas a pit is dug and lined with rocks previously heated in a fire. The food to be cooked is placed in the lined pit, often covered with leaves, and the whole is covered by a mound of earth. The heat from the rocks is retained by the earth insulation, and the food cooks slowly over time.
Another version of this method consists of digging a pit and lining it with hay or another good insulating material. A pot of food which has previously been heated up to a boil is placed in the pit, covered with more hay and then earth, and allowed to cook slowly with the retained heat.

THE HAYBOX COOKER
This latter method is the direct ancestor of the Haybox Cooker, which is simply a well insulated box lined with a reflective material into which a pot of food previously brought to a boil is placed. The food is cooked in 3 to 6 hours by the heat retained in the insulated box. The insulation greatly slows the loss of conductive heat, convective heat in the surrounding air is trapped inside the box, and the shiny lining reflects the radiant heat back into the pot.
Simple haybox style cookers could be introduced along with fuel-saving cook stoves in areas where slow cooking is practised. How these boxes should be made, and from what materials, is perhaps best left to people working in each region. Ideally, of course, they should be made of inexpensive, locally available materials and should fit standard pot sizes used in the area.

BUILDING INSTRUCTIONS
There are several principles which should be kept in mind in regard to the construction of a haybox cooker:
Insulation should cover an six sides of the box (especially the bottom and lid). If one or more sides are not insulated, heat will be lost by conduction through the uninsulated sides and much efficiency will be lost.
The box should be airtight. If it is not airtight, heat will be lost through warm air escaping by convection out of the box.
The inner surfaces of the box should be of a heat reflective material (such as aluminium foil) to reflect radiant heat from the pot back to it.

A simple, lightweight haybox can be made from a 60 by 120 cm sheet of rigid foil-faced insulation and aluminium tape. Haybox cookers can also be constructed as a box-in-a-box with the intervening space filled with any good insulating material. The required thickness of the insulation will vary with how efficient it is (see below).

Good Insulating Materials Suggested Wall Thickness
Cork 5 cm
Polystyrene sheets/pellets/drinking cups  5 cm
Hay/straw/rushes  10 cm
Sawdust/wood shavings 10 cm
Wool/fur  10 cm
Fiberglas/glass wool 10 cm
Shredded newspaper/cardboard 10 cm
Rice hulls/nut shells 15 cm

The inner box should have a reflective interior: aluminium foil, shiny aluminium sheeting, old printing plates, other polished sheet metal’ or silver paint will all work. The box can be wooden, or a can-in-a-can, or cardboard, or any combination; a pair of cloth bags might also work. Be inventive. Always be sure the lid is air tight.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
There are some adjustments involved in cooking with haybox cookers:
Less water should be used since it is not boiled away.
Less spicing is needed since the aroma is not boiled away.
Cooking must be started earlier to give the food enough time to cook at a lower temperature than over a stove.
Haybox cookers work best for large quantities (over 4 lifers) as small amounts of food have less thermal mass and cool faster than a larger quantity. Two or more smaller amounts of food may be placed in the box to cook simultaneously.
The food should boil for several minutes before being placed in the box. This ensures that all the food is at boiling temperature, not just the water.

The boxes perform best at low altitudes where boiling temperature is highest. They should not be expected to perform as well at high altitudes. One great advantage of haybox cookers is that the cook no longer has to keep up a fire or watch or stir the pot once it’s in the box. In fact, the box should not be opened during cooking as valuable heat is lost. And finally, food will never burn in a haybox.

Thermal Cooking

Welcome to my thermal cooker thermo cooking web blog where I hope to collect and share information on the methods and functions of using slow cooking for what ever need you might have.

I plan on pulling information in on haybox cookers, vacuum flask cooking, thermos and wonderboxes that use the process of an insulated container to store the heat and cook the food we eat daily or in emergency situations. Along with the how to’s and what for’s and recipes for these non-electric slow cookers.

Lamb Shanks in Rich Tomato Sauce

Boiling time on stove: 15 minutes

Cooking time in Dream-Pot: 5 hours

Ingredients
4 Lamb shanks (each cut into 3 or 4 pieces)
4 tbsp plain flower (season with salt and pepper)
4 tblsp oil
2 cloves garlic
2 onions
2 tsp curry powder
2 tblsp sugar
4 tblsp cornflour
salt and pepper
2@400g tins peeled tomatoes
2 tblsp tomato paste
1 tsp salt
1 pinch dried mixed herbs
2 cups hot water

Method
1. Dust the shanks with seasoned flour
2. Brown the shanks in hot oil in a heavy based frying pan. set aside
3. Saute the garlic and onions in a little hot oil in the large inner pot. Ensure the heat is not too high so that the garlic does not burn. Stir continually
4. Mix the curry powder into the garlic and onion
5. qadd the tomatoes with liquid, tomato paste, salt , mixed herbs and hot water
6. Bring to boil, stirring continually
7. Add the lamb shanks.Stir,Cover with lid an dbring back to boil again , stirring intermittently
8. Adjust heat to maintain a continual gentle boil for 15 minutes, checking and still stirring occasionally
9.Transfer into Dream Pot
10. Prior to serving, thicken the liquid and adjust the seasoning to taste with salt and pepper. To do this, remove the lamb shanks. Place the inner pot back onto the heat and bring back to boil, stirring. Add the cornflour (mixed with a little water to make pourable paste). Continue to stir until thickened. Then add the sugar and extra salt and pepper to taste
11 Return the lamb shanks to the sauce , bring back to boil and serve

I am sure that some of the ingredients in the Cobb thread would add to what looks like a tasty recipe.

The beauty of the Dream Pot is that meals can be prepared well ahead and can be eaten several hours after the completed cooking time (5 hours for shanks).

Pot Roast

innerpot boiling time on stove 30 mincooking time in dream pot 2/hrs

1 1/2 kg piece rolled chuck roast

METHOD

put meat piece into inner stainless steel pot

cover with hot water until the pot is 2/3 full

add seasoning and bring to the boil

when boiling.reduce heat and boil gently low heat for 30 min

transfer stainless steel pot to outer pot for 2 hours

thermo cooking time approx 30 min per 500 g plus another 30 min extra

Bread & Butter Pudding

wafflesBoiling time on stove: 10 minutes
Cooking time in thermal cooker: 1 1/2 hours minimum.

Ingredients:
Ratio:
1 cup milk
1 tblspn sugar
1 egg
Vanilla essence
2 tblspns sultanas
2 slices bread buttered and spread with jam and then cut into fingers
Nutmeg
Coconut
Method:
Warm the milk with the sugar in the small inner pot.
Beat egg and add to warm milk with vanilla. Stir in sultanas.
Place bread on top of milk mixture.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and coconut.
Almost 1/2 fill large inner pot with hot water and bring to the boil
Place the small inner pot into the large inner pot. Put on the lid.
Slow boil for 10 minutes on the stove (as a double saucepan).
Place complete 2 inner pots into the thermal cooker.
Let stand for minimum time.

Corned Silverside

http://www.dreampot.com.au/recipes/corned-silverside/corned_beef_veges_dream-pot 1170289519.jpg

Boiling time on stove: 20 minutes
Cooking time in Dream-Pot: 3 hours minimum

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 kg corned silverside
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup brown vinegar
  • 1 tbs french mustard
  • hot water

Method:

  1. Place all ingredients into large inner pot. Cover until approx. 2/3 full with hot water and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally.
  2. Gently boil on low heat for twenty minutes, covered with lid, checking occasionally that a gentle boil is maintained. If desired, add whole vegetables for the last 10 minutes of the boiling time
  3. Transfer into the Dream-Pot for 3 hours minimum. Can be served after 3 hours, or when travelling, serve at day’s end

Chicken, Sweet Corn and Vegetable Soup

http://www.dreampot.com.au//recipes/vegetable-soup/
Boiling time on stove: 10 minutes.
Cooking time in Dream-Pot: 1.5 hours minimum.

Ingredients:

  • 1 swede
  • 1 large onion
  • 1 turnip
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 zucchini
  • 3 celery sticks
  • 1 large potato
  • 1 cup frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1.5 litres boiling water
  • 1 packet cream of chicken soup
  • 1 packet chicken noodle soup
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1.5 tsp garlic powder
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 can sweet corn including juice
  • 1.5 chicken breast fillets (500 grams)

Method:

  1. Cut vegetables into small cubes
  2. Place all vegetables into large inner pot. Add boiling water. Bring to boil, stirring intermittently.
  3. Add soup mixes,(throughly mixed into the cold water). garlic powder, salt & pepper,sweet corn & diced chicken breasts. Stir well to combine.
  4. Return to boil, reduce heat and gently boil for 10 minutes, with lid on – stirring intermittaently.
  5. Transfer to Dream-Pot for minimum cooking time After 1.5 hours, serve with hot crusty bread or serve at the end of your day’s travel!

http://www.survivalblog.com/2007/12/time_and_energy_efficient_cook.html

Time and Energy Efficient Cooking, by KBF (Dec 12 2007)

 

I wish to share some valuable information on my personal experiences with the use of two cooking devices which I incorporate into daily homemaking practice when I am attempting to conserve on water and on fuel usage. Both of them are extremely time and energy efficient.

The two kitchen products which have earned their weight in silver in my home are my pressure cookers, and my newest kitchen toys, which come from an old Asian origin and cooking concept, the thermo cooker pot.

I have and use several sizes of pressure cookers. I chose the pot size for use for the job I’m performing based on the fill capacity of the product I am cooking in it. The pot capacity should never be over 2/3rds full. The food is liquid pressure cooked on the basis of requiring very little water or liquid and a minimal amount is lost and released as pressurized steam, thus it cooks evenly, thoroughly, and quickly. Time savings average about one half compared to the usual on the stove top methods. Fuel savings are dependant on the time required for the recipe. I use this method for large vegetable batches, and large cuts of meat, like roast cuts or several chickens and get a finished product that is tender to cut with a fork. My very large pressure pots are mostly used for canning purposes to put up jars of volume batches of seasonal produce, meats, and jellies. Using the pressure cookers overall cuts my actual cooking and canning time by one third, compared to using the open pot boil methods. When you are putting up hundreds of jars, this time efficiency becomes necessity. I have had a few mishaps however over the years. They were character building learning experiences of what not to cook in a pressure cooker. Beans, rice, and whole grain cereals need to be constantly monitored, as the small needle outlet from which the pressurized steam escapes becomes easily clogged, and when it does you have now created a bean bomb! If you’re like me and are multitasking in or out of the household, constant sitting to a pot is not time efficient or possible. I have discovered my next favorite device as a result of this need to cook my one pot meal favorite dishes and also to simultaneously free myself to leave to do other equally important jobs. This device allows me to leave the house and come home hours later to a safe, hot cooked meal.

The thermo cooker pot is actually two pots, one (the cooking pot) is inserted into a second thermo insulated pot and is sealed with a hermetic seal lid. The pots can be found in Asian market stores, online, and from high end kitchen and industrial supply houses and are sold by numerous makers. Some makers sell their pots to other distributors who stick their retail labels on them. More expensive in this case is not necessarily a better pot. Key points of its success for your needs are to consider the following issues when searching to procure one. The pot set needs to be constructed of excellent quality stainless steel in order to maintain heat conductivity and easily clean and withstand staining. The floor of the pot must be constructed of no less than two air-insulated layers. The inner pot’s volume size needs to be one that will compromise and accommodate the majority of food dishes you normally prepare, if you desire to own just one size. Think in volumes of servings somewhere between how much soup, stew, arroz con pollo [rice and chicken], or how much hot grain cereal you make in one batch. Waste is non productive and expensive ultimately in time and money. Thermo cooker pots work on the principals of applying fast radiant energy cooking to your prepared dish by using the inner cooking pot on the stovetop. The recipe chosen must be able to be brought up to and kept to a boiling temperature for at least 5 minutes, the longer you can boil it the better. Secondly, this inner pot is covered and then immediately placed inside the slightly larger external thermo chamber pot, it is tightly sealed, and taken off the radiant source to finish the cooking process over the next hour on its own kinetic heat requiring no external fuel source. I leave mine in the warmest location in the house. The food contained inside the thermo chamber continues to cook by conductant heat for the next hour or so at a heat temperature gradient loss of kinetic energy which gradually decreases over 6 hours of time and maintains itself at a warming temperature up to 8 hours. The food will then remain warm to +/- 160 degrees up to 8 hours, this being dependant on normal external ambient room temperatures. I have tested my unit with a thermometer after 8 hours, and it made the grade in 65 degree ambient room temperature. This can be a boon to use in fuel and time conservation modes during TEOTWAWKI. It can also be used inversely chill perishable foods safely for consumption for 6 to 8 hours. Think summer mayonaise and egg based salads or cool fruit salads or transporting fresh farm pot cheeses without ice.

I have now mastered my pots usage to include making yogurt, soft goat cheeses and tofu successfully by not boiling the milk or soybean curd but by bringing it slowly up to incubation temp for the culture I am using, and then using the thermo pot to finish the process of maintaining the heat source. In the past I used an old wide mouth thermos bottle to do this method but it did not hold enough volume for my family’s consumption or barter needs. We also now wake up to fresh hot maple wheat berry cereal in the morning by preparing this before retiring for the night. I have used the thermo pot now on different stove and fuel sources, including wood burning and get pretty consistent result. I have used it even away from home to travel and on hunting trips using the butane camp stove. I have boiled the recipes required water, and dumped in our packaged dehydrated camp food, to either wake up to warm eggs and sausage or to come back from the hunt to eat a great hot meal.

I hope this info will help all the cookies create more efficiency in their survival preparations and also to help them find more enjoyment time to read JWR’s great postings and books!
Have a blessed and bountiful New Year!

The Haybox: Why Every Household Needs One

http://www.talkingleaves.org/node/142

|

2003 Spring

“Revolutionary Kitchen Device Guarantees

  • No more burnt rice, beans, or soup
  • 20%-80% cooking fuel savings
  • Food kept hot for hours, ready whenever you are
  • Dramatic reduction in food-tending time
  • Almost unlimited flexibility in cooking schedule
  • 25% cook-water savings
  • Optimal flavor and nutrition
  • Ideal for feeding large groups!”
  • If the above were an actual ad, it would likely provoke a few questions:

    (1) Is this just a lot of hype, a quick-sell con job?
    (The answer is, fortunately, no. This essential kitchen device is not a fraudulent marketing ploy but an easy-to-build item, and it actually performs as described.)

    (2) If such a device exists, why doesn’t everyone have one?
    (I don’t know. Everyone should have one. We live in a commercial culture where do-it-yourself ecological practices are not promoted because they don’t make anyone a fast buck or increase the GNP. More education is necessary.)

    (3) How can my household or community get one?
    (It’s easy: make it yourself.)

    The device I’ve described is a haybox, also known as a retained-heat cooker, insulated cooker, or wonder box. Of all the sustainable technologies I’ve encountered in my years of living in community, it’s the one that is the most universally applicable and appropriate. In short, every community and household should have one–or ideally, more than one. We at Lost Valley Educational Center have five; Aprovecho Research Center (which has led the way in educating about them) has at least half a dozen; other intentional communities, urban cooperatives, co-housing and activist groups are discovering them; and some eco-pioneers are even whispering about installing hayboxes in the White House once it is recaptured from its current occupiers in 2004. Good for people, good for the earth, and good for our country, hayboxes are the essence of patriotism. In fact, only terrorists wouldn’t like them.

    Hayboxes work on the simple principle that if the heat applied to food in the cooking process can be retained within that food, rather than lost to the environment, no “replacement heat” is needed to keep the food cooking. In conventional cooking, any heat applied to a pot after food reaches boiling temperatures is merely replacing heat lost to the air by the pot. In haybox cooking, food is brought to a boil on the stove, simmered for a few minutes (5 minutes for rice or other grains, 15 minutes for large dry beans or whole potatoes), then put into an insulated box, where it completes its cooking. Food will be ready in anywhere from one to one-and-a-half times the “normal” completion time, with no tending needed and no danger of burning, and will stay piping hot for many hours, allowing maximum flexibility in the cook’s and the eaters’ schedules. For grains or beans, water is reduced by one-quarter, because water is retained within the food rather than simmered away into the air (it’s important to use pots with tight-fitting lids in haybox cooking). The larger the quantity cooked, the more effective this technique is (the hotter the food will stay, for longer), because increased thermal mass holds more heat. And because most of the cooking occurs in the 180 degrees F-212 degrees F range, rather than at a constant 212 degrees , more flavor and nutrients are preserved.

    As in conventional cooking, presoaking and draining beans makes them easier to cook and to digest. A few particularly long-cooking foods, such as garbanzo beans, may need reboiling part-way through the cooking process. For health reasons, meat dishes should always be reboiled before serving–but all other foods should be safe to eat straight out of the haybox. (However, don’t put a partially-eaten pot of lukewarm food back into the haybox without first reheating it, since hayboxes are not only excellent cookers but also ideal incubation chambers for yogurt and other bacteria-rich food.)

    Hayboxes are easy to construct through a variety of methods. The haybox itself is any kind of insulated container that can withstand cooking temperatures and fits relatively snugly around the pot. Effective insulation materials include hay, straw, wool, feathers, cotton, rice hulls, cardboard, aluminum foil, newspaper, fiberglass, fur, rigid foam, and others. The insulation is placed between the rigid walls of a box, within a double bag of material, or lining a hole in the ground. Campers have created “instant hayboxes” by wrapping a sleeping bag, blankets, and/or pillows around a pot. The most effective insulating materials create many separate pockets of air, which slow down the movement of heat. Two to four inches of thickness, depending on the material, are necessary for good insulation. Some materials, such as aluminum foil or mylar, actually reflect heat back toward the pot.

    Any material used must withstand temperatures up to 212 degrees F without melting (exposed styrofoam won’t work), and without releasing toxic fumes or dangerous fibers (rigid foam and fiberglass both need to be covered). The insulation also must be dry, and be kept dry (an inner layer of aluminum foil or mylar can help prevent cooking moisture from entering the wall of the box). The box should be as snug-fitting as possible around the pot, with a tight seal so that heat does not escape from the cooking cavity. Build your haybox to fit your largest pot; for smaller pots in the same box, you can increase performance by wrapping towels, blankets, or pillows around the pot.

    Hayboxes used on a regular basis or in a group setting need to be durable: I’d recommend constructing a wooden box, with a “hat” type lid (so that the opening is at the bottom, to minimize heat loss). Attach handles to make lifting this upper section easier, and line the inner walls with mylar if possible (it can be salvaged from used food storage containers, balloons, etc.). If you can’t find mylar, be prepared to replace your aluminum foil lining periodically. Depending on where you are using the haybox, you may want to attach casters to the bottom of your base. Find a good place to store and use your haybox, within or easily accessible to the kitchen.

    One final guarantee: once you’re a haybox devotee, you will never willingly go back to conventional methods of preparing pots of grains, beans, or long-cooking soups again, especially if you’re feeding a group. Happy cooking!

    A different version of this article first appeared in the Summer 2002 issue of Communities: Journal of Cooperative Living (see www.ic.org).

    For further information, contact Aprovecho Research Center, 80574 Hazelton Rd., Cottage Grove, OR 97424, (541) 942-8198, apro@efn.org, www.efn.org/~apro.

    Chris Roth is a haybox devotee living at Lost Valley Educational Center.

     

    ©2003 Talking Leaves
    Spring 2003
    Volume 13, Number 1
    Communication & Eco-Culture

    Haybox

    http://www.lostvalley.org/haybox1.html

    Hayboxes
    Haybox cooking (also called retained-heat cooking) is an age-old method that can be used to conserve energy not only during times of crisis, but anytime. Depending on the food item and amount cooked, the use of a haybox or insulated cooker saves between 20% and 80% of the energy normally needed to cook a food. The longer an item usually takes on a stovetop, the more fuel is saved. For example, with a haybox, five pots of long-cooking dry beans will use the same amount of fuel to cook to completion as just one pot cooked without a haybox.

    The principle of retained-heat cooking is simple. In conventional cooking, any heat applied to the pot after it reaches boiling temperature is merely replacing heat lost to the air by the pot. In haybox cooking, food is brought to a boil, simmered for a few minutes depending on the particle size (5 minutes for rice or other grains, 15 minutes for large dry beans or whole potatoes), then put into the haybox to continue cooking. Since the insulated cooker prevents most of the heat in the food from escaping into the environment, no additional energy is needed to complete the cooking process. The hayboxed food normally cooks within one to two times the normal stovetop cooking time. It can be left in the haybox until ready to serve, and stays hot for hours. “Timing” is much less important than in stovetop cooking: stick a pot of rice, beans, or stew in at lunch time, and it will be ready when you are, and steaming hot, at dinner time.

    The haybox itself is any kind of insulated container that can withstand cooking temperatures and fits relatively snugly around the pot. Hayboxes have been made using hay, straw, wool, feathers, cotton, rice hulls, cardboard, aluminum foil, newspaper, fiberglass, fur, rigid foam, and/or other suitable materials as insulation. The insulation is placed between the rigid walls of a box, within a double bag of material, or lining a hole in the ground. “Instant hayboxes” have been created by wrapping a sleeping bag, blankets, and/or pillows around a pot. The most effective insulating materials create many separate pockets of air, which slow down the movement of heat. 2 to 4 inches of thickness (depending on the material) are necessary for good insulation. Some materials, such as aluminum foil or mylar, actually reflect heat back toward the pot. Important characteristics of any insulating material incorporated into a haybox include:

    • It must withstand cooking temperatures (up to 212 degrees F or 100 degrees C) without melting.
    • It does not release toxic fumes (any kind of foam insulation needs to be covered with aluminum foil or mylar) or dangerous fibers (fiberglass also needs to be covered).
    • It can be fashioned to be as snug-fitting as possible around the pot. A little pot in a big box will not cook as effectively; it’s better to wrap pillows, towels, or blankets around it to fill up the space.
    • It can be made to form a relatively tight seal, so that heat does not escape from the cooking cavity. Since hot air rises, a container designed to open at the base rather than the top will retain more heat.
    • It is dry, and can be kept dry, since wet materials don’t insulate as well. An inner layer of aluminum foil or mylar helps keep cooking moisture from entering the walls of the box. Mylar, which can be salvaged from used food storage containers, balloons, etc., tends to be a more durable inner layer than aluminum foil.

    Cooking containers, too, should have tight-fitting lids, to prevent the escape of heat and moisture.

    Since water is not lost in haybox cooking the way it is during extended stovetop simmering, the amount of water used to cook grains and beans is normally reduced by one-quarter. Instead of adding 2 cups of water per cup of dry rice, try adding 1 1/2. Also, the larger the amount cooked, the more effective haybox cooking is, since a full pot has more mass and therefore more heat storage capacity than a half-full pot. Haybox cooking is ideally suited for a family or large group, or anytime there’s a reason to cook in quantity. If you’re cooking alone, try cooking full pots of food using a haybox, then reheating small portions for individual meals–this too can conserve fuel.Retained-heat cooking has many other advantages in addition to energy and water conservation. As mentioned, it makes “timing” less critical, since it keeps meals hot until serving time. Once the initial boil-and-short-simmer stage is past, it also eliminates the danger of burning the food on the bottom of the pot (the sad fate of too many pots of grains, beans, or other foods left simmering too long without stirring on the stove). Hayboxed food can actually be better for you, and tastier, than food prepared exclusively on a stovetop, because most of the cooking takes place in the 180 degrees F to 212 degrees F range, rather than at a constant 212 degrees F (lower temperatures preserve more flavor and nutrients, as they also do in crockpot cooking and solar cooking).

    If you want to prepare multiple items for a meal but have only a limited number of flame sources, hayboxes can also greatly facilitate the logistics of food preparation. For example, you can bring your beans to a boil, simmer them 15 minutes, put them in a haybox; then bring your rice to a boil, simmer it 5 minutes, put it in another haybox; then prepare your vegetable stir-fry or soup, etc. At the end, you’ll have a uniformly hot, unburnt, multi-dish meal, all off a single flame, probably consuming less total fuel than you would have used simply to cook the longest-cooking item alone without a haybox. You’ll also have used one-quarter less of your drinkable water supply in preparing the food.

    Presoaking and draining beans always makes them easier to cook, as well as to digest. A few particularly long-cooking foods, such as garbanzo beans, may need reboiling part-way through the cooking process. For health reasons, meat dishes should always be reboiled before serving.

    Hayboxes are second only to solar cookers (which, however, are dependent on sunshine) in their potential to conserve resources. They’re easy to build, easy to use, and have many other advantages. Y2K or no Y2K, they deserve a place in every home.

    Retained Heat Cooking

    http://solarcooking.org/heat-retention/ret-heat.htm

    Once food is heated to boiling, cooking can continue in an insulated box

    Daily cooking [on a stove or over a fire] frequently includes a long simmering period which is required for many beans, grains, stews, and soups. The amount of fuel needed to complete these cooking processes can be greatly reduced by cooking with retained heat. Even today, in some parts of the world, a pit is dug and lined with rocks previously heated in a fire. The food to be cooked is placed in the lined pit, often covered with leaves. Then the whole thing is covered with a mound of earth. The heat from the rocks cannot [easily] escape and the food is cooked very slowly.

    Another version of this method consists of digging a pit and lining it with hay or another good insulating material. A pot of food which has previously been heated up to a boil is placed in the pit, covered with more hay and earth, and allowed to cook slowly with the retained heat.

    This latter method is the direct ancestor of the “Haybox Cooker,” which is simply a well-insulated box or basket lined with a reflective material into which a pot of food previously brought to a boil is placed. The insulation greatly slows the loss of conductive heat, and the shiny lining reflects the radiant heat back into the pot. This works best when the pot fits snugly into the insulation with no air in between.

    Such a box or basket can easily be made of inexpensive, locally available materials. It can be wooden, or cardboard, or any combination. Hay, straw, rushes, feathers, sawdust, rags, wool, shredded paper, etc. are all good insulating materials.

    Principles to be kept in mind are these:

    • Insulation should cover all six sides of the box.
    • The box should be airtight.
    • The inner surfaces of the box should be of a heat-reflective material.

    There are some adjustments involved in cooking with haybox cookers:

    • Less water should be used since it is not boiled away.
    • Less spice in needed since the aroma is not boiled away.
    • Cooking must be started earlier to give the food enough time to cook at a lower temperature than on the solar cooker or over a fire.
    • The food should boil for several minutes before being placed in the box. This ensures that all the food is at boiling temperature, not just the water.
    • Haybox cookers work best for large quantities, as small amounts of food have less thermal mass and cool Preheated stones could always be put in together with the pot to prove the additional thermal mass needed to keep the temperature up over a long period of time.

    (This above portion of this article was excerpted from Cooking with the Sun, State Technical College, Altötting, Neuötting Str. 64 c, 84503, Altötting, Germany)

    Types of thermal cookers

    Main Meals

    Many of the following recipes were found here: http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/main.php?mod=Dynamic&id=23

    Click on the individual headings to goto the specific recipe.

    Stuffed Cabbage Rolls
    An interestingly tasty dish that is visually appealing.

    Serves 6.

    * 1 head of green Cabbage.
    * 1 teaspoon of Cumin Seeds.
    * 1 lb (1/2 a kg) of minced Turkey.
    * 1 teaspoon of Olive Oil.
    * 1 large Onion, peeled and cut into chunks.
    * 3 cloves of Garlic, peeled and crushed.
    * 1/2 a cup of green Capsicums, seeded and cut into chunks.
    * 1/4 of a cup of chopped Parsley.
    * 1/4 of a cup of Tomato Paste.
    * 1/2 a teaspoon of ground Cumin.
    * 1 tablespoon of dried Dill.
    * 1/2 a teaspoon of Salt.
    * 1/4 of a teaspoon of ground Black Pepper.
    * 3 cups of cooked long-grain Brown Rice.
    * 1 Egg, well beaten.
    * 1 litre of Tomato Juice.
    * 2 tablespoons of Corn flour.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 15 minutes.

    Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of 2 hours.

    1. Core the Cabbage with a sharp knife.
    2. Place the cored Cabbage in a large pot and cover it with water.
    3. Bring the pot to the boil for 3 minutes.
    4. Remove the Cabbage and when it is cool enough to handle break off as many leaves as are cooked to a supple softness.
    5. You will need 12 leaves so you may have to replace the Cabbage in the boiling water to prepare the remaining leaves.
    6. Heat the Olive Oil in a large frying pan on medium heat and toast the Cumin Seeds for 2 minutes.
    7. Add the minced Turkey and cook until browned, stirring to ensure the meat is freely broken into small pieces.
    8. Add the Onions and Garlic and cook until the Onions are translucent, about 3 minutes.
    9. Add the green Capsicum, Parsley, Tomato Paste, Cumin, Dill, Salt and Pepper and mix together thoroughly.
    10. Remove from the heat and stir in the cooked Brown Rice and the beaten Egg.

    To make the Rolls: –

    1. Lay the Cabbage leaf flat and spoon 2/3 of a cup of the filling into the centre.
    2. Fold all four sides until they meet in the centre.
    3. Tie securely with butchers string and place them into the Cook and Carry pot.
    4. When all the rolls are inside pour in the Tomato Juice and use medium heat to bring the covered pot to the boil.
    5. Boil for 1 minute.Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker. for a minimum of 3 hours.

    Making the sauce: –

    1. Make a sauce by stirring the liquid from the cooked Cabbage rolls into a medium saucepan.
    2. You should have approximately 3 cups and if there is not enough you can add more Tomato Juice.
    3. Remove 4 tablespoons of this liquid and mix it with the Corn flour in a small bowl to make a paste.
    4. Bring the liquid in the saucepan to the boil then remove from the heat.
    5. Stir in the paste and then return the saucepan to the heat stirring as it comes to the boil to thicken.

    Serving: –

    1. Cut the Butchers string off the rolls and remove carefully.
    2. Place two rolls on each serving plate and cover with the sauce.

    Jambalaya
    A traditional hot chunky style chicken stew that really brings out the flavours of the deep south.

    Serves 6

    * A 3.3 lb (1 1/2 kg) whole Chicken.
    * 1 Teaspoon of Olive Oil.
    * 125 grams (4.4 ounces) of Short Cut Bacon, sliced into approximately 2 cm pieces.
    * 3 medium Onions, peeled and chopped into large chunks.
    * 3 cloves of Garlic, peeled and crushed.
    * 1 Red Capsicum, seeded and chopped into 2 cm cubes
    * 1 Yellow Capsicum, seeded and chopped into 2 cm cubes.
    * 3 medium Carrots, peeled and finely sliced.
    * 2 stalks of Celery, finely chopped.
    * 1 tablespoon of Chili Powder.
    * 1/2 a tablespoon of Crushed Cayenne Pepper or Paprika.
    * 1-1/2 cups of Long Grain White Rice.
    * 1/2 a cup of Tomato Paste.
    * 3 cups of Ham Stock.
    * 1 can of tinned Diced Tomatoes.
    * 1/2 a teaspoon of crushed Black Pepper.
    * 1/2 a cup of minced Parsley.
    * 1 Bay Leaf.
    * 1 bunch of Fresh Spinach, remove the stems, rinse well and cut into fine shreds.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 17 minutes including frying time.

    Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of one hour.

    1. Cut the legs, thighs and breast off the Chicken, remove the skin and bones then cut the meat into large chunks and set this aside.
    2. Note: – the Chicken discards and bones can be used for a stock for other meals later.
    3. Lightly brown the Chicken in the pot then remove it and place it aside for later.
    4. Pour the Olive Oil into the pot and add the Bacon and brown it on all sides.
    5. Stir in the Onions and Garlic, and cook for 2 minutes.
    6. Add in the Capsicums, Carrots, Celery, Chili Powder and Cayenne (or Paprika), and stir until all the vegetables are coated with the spices.
    7. Add the rest of the ingredients except the Spinach, bring the mixture to the boil and then turn down the heat to simmer for 15 minutes with the lid on.
    8. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker for a minimum of one hour.

    To serve: –

    * Spread the Spinach shreds over each plate to form a crisp green nest and then spoon the hot Jambalaya on to this nest.

    Poached Herb Chicken
    Herbed chicken and vegetables…what more can you say…..just enjoy.

    Serves 6

    * 1 roasting Chicken approximately 3.75-4.5 lb (1 3/4 to 2 kg).
    * 1 cup assorted Fresh Herbs of your choice.
    * I teaspoon of Olive Oil.
    * 1 medium white Onion, peeled and coarsely chopped.
    * 3 large Carrots, peeled and cut into quarters.
    * 6 medium Red Potatoes, well scrubbed but not peeled.
    * 6 cups of Chicken Stock.
    * 1 Teaspoon of Salt.
    * 10 whole Black Peppercorns.
    * 2 cups of fresh Green Beans.
    * 1/4 of a cup of Dijon Mustard.
    * 3 tablespoons of Cornflour.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 10 minutes.

    Thermal Cooking time: – A minimum of 3 hours.

    1. Wash and dry the Chicken, removing any visible fat.
    2. Stuff the cavity with the Herbs and then put it in the refrigerator until ready for use.
    3. Heat the pot on medium and add the Olive Oil and Onions, fry for about 3 minutes.
    4. Add the Carrots and continue frying for another 2 minutes.
    5. Place the prepared Chicken on top of the Onions and Carrots and then tuck the Potatoes all around the Chicken.
    6. Pour the Stock over the Chicken and Vegetables and bring to a full boil.
    7. Add the Salt and Peppercorns, skimming off any foam that rises to the surface.
    8. Place the Green Beans on top of the Chicken and put the lid on the pot.
    9. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker.
    10. Leave for a minimum of 3 hours.

    Before serving the meal: –

    Make the sauce.

    * Take 3 cups of the hot Chicken Stock from the pot and pour it into a fat strainer jug.
    * When the fat has risen to the top, pour the “defatted” liquid into a saucepan.
    * Remove 1/3 of a cup of this liquid and mix it with the Cornflour in a small bowl to make a paste.
    * Stir the Mustard into the saucepan and heat gentle.
    * Remove the saucepan from the heat, stir in the slurry and then return to the heat and bring the mixture to the boil to thicken.
    * When suitably thickened turn off the heat.

    To serve the meal.

    * Remove the Chicken from the pot and slice it thinly.
    * Serve the Chicken with the Potatoes and Green Beans and pour the sauce over the top.

    Spicy Baked Beans
    A hot and spicy bean meal that is well accompanied by nachos and dipping chips.

    Serves 12

    * 1 teaspoon of Olive Oil.
    * 2 1/2 cups of chopped Onions.
    * 2 cloves of Garlic, peeled, crushed and finely chopped.
    * 1 tablespoons of freshly grated Ginger.
    * 2 cups of Carrots, peeled and finely sliced.
    * 2 cups of Apples, peeled and cored and sliced.
    * 1 teaspoon of Cayenne Pepper.
    * 1/2 a cup of Tomato Paste.
    * 1/2 a cup of Dijon Mustard.
    * 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire Sauce.
    * 1/2 a cup of Brown Sugar.
    * 2 tablespoons of Balsamic Vinegar.
    * 1 cup of Tomato Paste or Tomato Sauce plus a half a cup of water.
    * 1/2 a cup of Raisins.
    * 1/2 a tablespoon of crushed Chili Pepper.
    * 1 Bay Leaf.
    * 2.25 lb (1kg) of Red Kidney Beans soaked overnight beforehand.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 5 to 10 minutes.

    Thermal cooking time: – a minimum of 4 hours.

    1. Add the oil to the bottom of the pot and fry the Onions over a medium heat for approximately 3 minutes or until they soften and clear.
    2. Remove from the heat and add the chopped Garlic, Ginger and Cayenne allowing the mixture to cool for about 30 seconds, stirring to release the volatile oils.
    3. Stir in the Carrots and Apples until they are well coated with the spices.
    4. Add the rest of the ingredients, stir thoroughly and place back on the heat to bring the mixture to a steady boil.
    5. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot to the Thermal Cooker, close the lid.
    6. Leave the meal to Thermal cook for a minimum of 4 hours.

    Lamb Shanks with Cous Cous
    A tasty and hearty meal with the Lamb Shanks tenderised to perfection.

    Serves 4.

    * 1 cup of Chick Peas soaked over night.
    * 4 Lamb Shanks trimmed to fit the pot.
    * 1/2 a cup of Flour.
    * 4 large Onions cut into quarters.
    * 3 cloves of Garlic crushed.
    * 1/2 a table spoon of mixed dried Herbs.
    * A small bunch of Parsley finely chopped.
    * 2 table spoons of Curry Paste (mild, medium or hot as required).
    * 3 Potatoes cut into large chunks.
    * 4 Carrots sliced thickly.
    * 4 large chunks of Pumpkin.
    * 3 cups of water or Vegetable Stock.
    * 2 table spoons of Tomato Paste.
    * Salt and Pepper to taste.
    * 400 grams (14.1 ounces) of Cous Cous.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 15 minutes.

    Thermal cooking time: – a minimum of 4 to 5 hours.

    1. Toss the shanks in seasoned flour.
    2. Place the shanks, onions, vegetables and herbs into the pot.
    3. Mix the curry paste and tomato paste with the stock and add to the mixture.
    4. Bring the mixture to a simmer point and add the pre-soaked chick peas.
    5. Turn down the heat and simmer for 15 minutes with the lid on.
    6. Turn off the heat and place the pot into the Thermal Cooker and close the lid, leaving it for atleast 4 to 5 hours.
    7. Cook the cous cous separately as per the packet direction when you are ready to eat.
    8. Serve the cous cous as an accompaniment to the main meal.

    Simple Lamb or Beef Stew
    A delightfully hearty meal for lunch or dinner especially when the weather is colder.

    Serves 6.

    * 2.25 lb (1 kg) of Lamb or Beef cubed into large pieces.
    * 2 tablespoons of plain Flour.
    * 1 tablespoon of Olive oil.
    * 2 large Onions cut into quarters.
    * 2 cloves of Garlic crushed.
    * 1 stalk of Celery sliced into medium pieces.
    * 1 Parsnip cubed into small pieces.
    * 1 Carrot cubed into small pieces.
    * 2 Potatoes cut into quarters
    * 1 packet of dried Green Peas.
    * 1 Massel Vegetable Stock Cube.
    * 2 table spoons of Soy Sauce.
    * 1/2 a cup of Barley.
    * 3 cups of water.
    * Salt and Pepper to taste.

    You can vary this to suit your tastes by the following: –

    * Add some mixed Herbs, either dried or fresh.
    * With the beef you can substitute one cup of water for a cup of Red Wine.
    * You may add two table spoons of Thai Red Curry Paste.
    * You may also add a tin of Tomatoes however you will need to adjust the water amount to compensate.
    * You may also substitute Frozen Vegetables for the fresh mentioned above.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 12 to 15 minutes.

    Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of 3 to 4 hours.

    1. Heat the oil in the pot and cook the onions and garlic over a medium heat until they are transparent.
    2. Remove the pot from the heat.
    3. Toss the cubed meat in seasoned flour.
    4. Add the vegetables, soy sauce and water to the pot with the cooked onions and garlic,
    5. Bring the contents to the boil over a medium heat and add the Meat, Barley, Stock and Dried Peas.
    6. Reduce the heat to a slow simmer for 12 to 15 minutes with the lid on, stirring occasionally.
    7. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker for a minimum of 3 to 4 hours

    Coq au Vin
    A very tasty chicken dish rich in mushrooms, bacon and herbs. One that will have them coming back for more.

    Serves 6.

    * 3-3.3 lb (1 1/2 kg) of Chicken pieces.
    * 3 slices of Bacon.
    * 4 Spring Onions chopped.
    * 4 small Onions sliced.
    * Some Olive oil for frying.
    * 250g of button Mushrooms.
    * 2 cloves of Garlic crushed.
    * 1 tablespoon of dried Thyme.
    * 8 small Potatoes, scrubbed and halved.
    * 1 cup of Red Wine.
    * 1 cup of Chicken Stock.
    * A small bunch of Parsley finely chopped.

    Cooking time on the stove: – 10 minutes

    Thermal cooking time: – A minimum of 1 hour

    1. In a large frying pan, fry the chicken pieces until well browned on all sides.
    2. Remove these and place them to one side.
    3. In the same pan brown the bacon and spring onions and then remove them to one side.
    4. Place the onions, mushrooms and garlic into the pot.
    5. Add the chicken, bacon, spring onion, salt and pepper to taste, thyme, potatoes, wine and stock.
    6. Bring the contents to the boil with the lid on and then turn down the heat to simmer for 10 minutes on low.
    7. Turn off the heat and transfer the pot into the Thermal Cooker and close the lid.
    8. Leave to Thermal cook for a minimum of one hour.

    Recipes above were found here: http://www.thermalcookware.com.au/main.php?mod=Dynamic&id=23

    Corned Silverside.

    1 ½ to 2 kilogram piece of Corned Beef (choose a square cut piece to fit easily)

    2 Bay leaves

    1 large Onion

    3 strips of Orange peel

    4 Cloves

    2 tablespoons of Brown Sugar

    1 cup of Balsamic Vinegar

    1 tablespoon of Mustard

    ½ a tablespoon of Peppercorns

    Water to cover.

    Simmering time on the stove top: 30 minutes

    Thermal Cooking time: 3 to 4 hours minimum.

    Place all the ingredients into the inner pot.

    Bring the contents to the boil.

    Reduce the heat to a simmer.

    Simmer gently for 30 minutes with the lid on.

    Turn off the heat and transfer the inner pot to the outer Thermal Container.

    Leave to complete the cooking for 3 to 4 hours minimum.

    You can add the required vegetables whole with the corned beef while it is being simmered or else you may wish to freshly cook vegetables to serve with the corned beef when you are ready to eat.

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